Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘publishers’

My, how the world of publishing is changing!  The print version of my novel Divas Never Flinch is about to come out.  I don’t know about you, but I envisioned huge presses running at astronomical speeds slapping out a book, to then be bound, and the cover added.  I asked my publisher how many copies would be in the first run. I expected the publisher to have a warehouse filled with printed books to be sent out to bookstores all over the country when they were ordered.    I had to be set straight, and was given a crash course in publishing in the world today.

First, the publisher has no inventory of books.  My publisher works through a distributer who also actually prints the books.  But do they have a warehouse full of printed books?  Again no.  It seems the world of books today is print on demand.  Say Amazon wants to have 100 books.  They contact the distributer and order 100 books.  The distributer goes to their print department and orders 100 books which are printed out on demand and sent to Amazon.

Bookstores used to order books for their shelves, and after a period of time would return any that were unsold.  About 40% of the books returned were damaged and unable to be sold again.  Wasteful and unprofitable for the publisher.   So now my publisher no longer accepts return of books.

And of the 250,000 books in print a bookstore might carry only about 60,000.  Hardly a lucrative outlet for most books.  Today most books  – ebooks or printed books – are sold online – Amazon, Barnes and Nobel, and Smashwords being the major players.

Now here’s what’s interesting.  The printing of the books on demand has a new tool.  There is a machine called the Espresso printer.  This printer has access to all the ISBN books and when a book is ordered the number is entered and the book begins to print.  The printing, the binding, the cover, the lamination all done in about 7 minutes, from start to finish.  Here is a link to a YouTube video.  It is really interesting and well worth watching.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ec2BZA50EaY

I’m sure this is not an exhaustive look at what is going on in publishing today, but it sure opened my eyes.  I know I have a lot more to learn, but I wanted to share this as I find it most enlightening.

 

Read Full Post »

It seems to be the general industry practice that a traditional publisher will not consider an unpublished manuscript unless it is solicited by the publisher, or is presented by an author’s agent.  It would be a waste of time to try to query publishers directly if you are looking to get your book published.

The exceptions are the self-publishing houses that solicit manuscripts from authors who then pay the full cost to get their manuscripts published.  This is not recommended unless you are looking to publish just a few copies of your book – for instance, for a family history where there will only be a few copies needed, and no sales or promotion required.

However, the new trend in publishing is what is called subsidiary publishing.  In this arrangement you submit your manuscript to the publisher and they evaluate it just like a traditional publishing house.  If they believe the manuscript warrants publication they will offer the author a contract for publication.  With a traditional publisher the author might be offered between 8 and 10 % of the royalty.  However with subsidiary publishing the author can receive up to 50% of the royalties.  A big advantage.  However, the author will be requested to put up a certain percentage of the publishing costs as well – about 17 to 18% of the total publishing costs.  A number of major publishing houses are now offering this type of contract as well as smaller houses.

My first novel, Divas Never Flinch, was published in a subsidiary publishing agreement with Brighton Publishing.  Their website is www.brightonpublishing.com.  There is a lot of good information on their site about the various forms of publishing and it is certainly worth a look if this is a route to publishing you might wish to consider.  They also tell you how you may submit manuscripts to them.  My experience with Brighton has been very positive so far, but we are still in the process of rolling out the printed version of the book.  Of course, e-books are the new wave of publishing, and Brighton seems well versed in this process as well.  You will certainly want to consider a publisher experienced in e-book publishing.

I consider my experience with the publishing world to be modest at best, and I am certain there is much more that could be written on this subject.  However, this is my experience and I wanted to share it.

I am certainly open to comments and additions from any of you if you care to contribute.

Read Full Post »